Backlash In Music

One of the most important albums of all time, with art inspired by Elvis Presley's debut extended play record. An album regarded as arguably the most inspirational and important albums in Rock 'n Roll.

One of the most important albums of all time, with art inspired by Elvis Presley's debut extended play record. An album regarded as arguably the most inspirational and important albums in Rock 'n Roll.

Parker Winn, Reporter

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As new musical styles and genres become popular, they gain as much infamy as they do fame. Whenever a new genre of music becomes popular, there always seems to be a negative reaction from older generations. Whether it be disapproval of a song’s contents, or a style deemed inappropriate or harmful, older generations like to seek out what they deem is wrong with a certain genre.

Take for example, the bad press that revolved around Elvis Presley. At the time, the ushering in of rock and roll was taken as an attack on established American society, or something that was dangerous and illicit. The exciting and energetic music of the world was generally confined to pre-civil rights era black nightclubs.

Rock ‘n roll as we know it today was once a taboo, and to a certain extent, considered malicious and barbaric. In a society still suffering from segregation and racial hate, Elvis’ mannerism on stage and even on his album covers rubbed the white majority the wrong way.

Despite -or perhaps because of- the nature of Elvis’ stage presence and controversy, he still managed to become the impactful rock idol we know him as today. Along with his emergence into the vein of popularity, as well as the legacy he left behind, he helped to usher in a new age of passionate, impactful music. Something we should all be eternally grateful for.

As time moves on, so does music. And with that passage of time, new musical styles are brought into the mainstream. Among these, rap, punk, and metal have all had their fair share of controversy and backlash.

Since their inception, punk and metal have been blamed for the seeding of blasphemous political opinions in youth, on both sides of the spectrum.

Heavy metal, specifically, has received flack for supposedly spreading paganism and anti-Christian sentiment. This counter-culture aspect of metal has been seen as a potentially dangerous and an especially negative influence on the impressionables of the world.

At the same time, punk and rap music have each suffered the collective glares of societal peoples for actively fighting the normative. Starting in the 1970’s and very likely lasting till the end of times, both punk rock and rap have affected the world in ways unlike any other genre of music.

The two shared, and continue to share common themes of protestation, anti police brutality and anti establishment themes. Of course, there are differences. Different histories and different characters, but the two share quite a bit. Specifically, the two share an affinity for angering the societies they belong to.

The ‘unfavorable’ nature of rap and punk is shared, but where rap is more comfortable fitting the mold of rhythm and blues, punk resides by itself. It resides in the corners of underground bars and the gritty basements of twenty-something- year-olds.

Punk came to be for the purpose of breaking the mold of society. In a social atmosphere that takes comfort in normative, ‘acceptable’ behavior, that mentality is frowned upon and especially disliked.

The impact that music has had on the world is undeniable, the strictures that the majority would inflict upon music will always be present. Likely, you don’t see that as right.

So, when efforts are made to boycott a song, a style of music, or media of any kind, know that it’s what you make of it. Love what you love. Ultimately, it’s up to you.