Stigma Surrounding Rap Concert Culture

Rap in particular is one genre that I’ve noticed, tends to attract a different kind of energy.... An energy that most parents, including my own, don’t really understand or support. Because there’s so much controversy surrounding the genre, it doesn’t surprise me that there’s an aggressive stigma of violence, drugs, and other edgy content could be considered offensive by today’s population.

Torey Tapp, Social Media Editor

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Music is something we all have in common. The only difference is what kind of music each of us prefer. Concerts give us the chance to have a good time enjoying the music we love and to share our time and interests with one another. Concerts, whatever the genre, are different.

Depending on the crowd it might attract, the venue, how popular a group is or what the music is depicting. These things all effect how smoothly the concert goes or how we might enjoy it. I am one who loves spending time with my friends at a good concert. And trust me, I’ve been to plenty. I enjoyed each of them for different things.

Yes, some were a little rough around the edges, made me wanna dance and sing or made me want to sleep at times, but they were all memorable and I, along with many others hold these nights close to my heart.

Rap in particular is one genre that I’ve noticed, tends to attract a different kind of energy…. An energy that most parents, including my own, don’t really understand or support. Because there’s so much controversy surrounding the genre, it doesn’t surprise me that there’s an aggressive stigma of violence, drugs, and other edgy content could be considered offensive by today’s population.

And a lot of today’s most popular rap can be considered offensive to those who don’t enjoy it. But for the ones who have found interest and enjoyment through these loud, jampacked, sweaty concerts beg to differ.

I’m not saying all rap concerts are this way, just the few in particular I have attended myself have been similar to this stereotype. A few artists that Boise Idaho has had the opportunity to attend in the past year are Kodak Black, Flatbush Zombies, YG, Smokepurp and most recently Shoreline Mafia. I have attended most of these along with a big population of Boise High students.

I can easily say that they wrecked me. I was sweaty, overwhelmed and a little bit intimidated. But I can also say that I still had a good time, and did not regret attending any of them. All of these things apply to all music, all artists, and everyone that enjoys them.

But due to provocative language or violent references included in lyrics along with social norms relating to rap (that should not be social norms at all) such as drug use, gang involvement, violence and murder, disrespectful sexual referencing and other negative factors, is something that does hugely affect the experience of rap concerts.

This happens simply because of the way music affects human emotion. Music and mood are closely interrelated. This is because of the rhythm and tone that we hear when listening to music. When listening to a slower rhythm it’s more likely for you to become relaxed. But when listening to louder, faster and more aggressive rhythms and lyrics it’s  more likely to become more upbeat, excited, or rowdy which leads to a wilder crowd at a majority of rap concerts.

I can think of other kinds of music that can be considered offensive or rowdy because of the language or the culture it attracts. This does not just apply to rap. This is all music with negative connotations and crazier crowds.

I’m not saying there’s a right or wrong, or good or bad way to listen to music. We like what we like and there’s not much you can do to change that. So finding ways to respect the people and the artists who love the music they love, even though you might disagree, is what we do.